In order to have the most accurate assessment of its supplies, fish mongers should use a barcode inventory system. Food Safety News noted that in the wake of the European horse meat scandal from earlier this year, food providers need to do everything possible to guarantee the accuracy of supplies and physical inventory counts.

According to research from the ocean advocacy group Oceana, the potential for fraud in the seafood sales industry is significant. More than 90 percent of all seafood consumed in the United States came from another country, and differences in standards between two nations can add great uncertainty to the labeling process. As a result, Oceana explained, between 26 percent and 87 percent of popular fish varieties sold like cod and snapper are actually another species.

Food Safety News reported that mislabeled fish can cause many problems. For example, it increases the likelihood of an eater accidentally having an allergic reaction, and it means that ignorance could be causing certain seafood to be stored and handled at improper temperatures.

To prevent these kinds of issues, fish purveyors should consider adopting a barcode inventory system. That way, these seafood sellers could more quickly and accurately determine what fish or shellfish is being stored and handled.

For more information on improving efficiency with barcode technology, download the free white paper entitled "Keeping the Physical World and the Virtual World in Sync" from DMS today.